Reconstruction Pipes


Altarnun (Cornish) Pipes

Developed during 1988/9 to produce an instrument based upon the bench end carvings in the church of St. Nonna, Altarnun, Bodmin Moor taking into account other carvings to be found in Cornwall as an integral part of PYBA the Cornish Bagpipe Project. The Specifications required a good volume without sounding like the Highland Pipes, Gaita or Zampogna. To fulfil these criteria the two chanters were based on the Bodego which has a very wide conical bore and fitted with modified shawm reeds (more...).

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Double Pipe

Dating from around the 13th Century and found in a number of church carvings throughout France as well as both Italy and Spain, it consists of a rectangular section chanter with two bores (Cylindrical) and was probably sounded by single beating reeds.

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English Double Chanter Bagpipe

Based upon a church carving, it is similar to that depicted at St. Mary's, Shrewsbury but in this case the chanters are of equal length. The format is of the compass of an octave and leading note split between the chanters.

See also Altarnun (Cornish) Pipes

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Great Bock

Taken from the illustration by Michael Praetorius in his book on the musical instruments of his day "Syntagma Musicum" 1618/19. The pitch is an octave lower than most other forms (more...).

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Luttrell Psalter Bagpipe

Taken from an illustration in the Psalter of Sir Geofffrey Luttrell (Died 1345) who included alongside the prayers, psalms and calendar a description of the village of Gerneham in Lincolnshire which he owned ( now known as Irnham ). It shows a chanter which is steeply conical in outline and a long trumpet like drone held in an upright position this latter having large projecting mountings on the sliding joints. The chanter stock is in the form of a kings head (more...).

See also Musical Instruments of the Luttrell Psalter

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phagotum (Phagotum Afranii)

Invented in the early 16th century by Afranio, a Canon of Ferrara in north east Italy a collector and player of musical instruments. A description survives from 1539 giving the story of the invention complete with illustrations with the history of it's development by John Baptist Ravillo (who also was involved with the Sourdeline). Consisting of two pillars, with open tone holes and keywork for each hand, the the upper sections contain reflexed cylindrical bores, one having a crook to extend the compass lower. Single beating reeds of metal are used and it is bellows blown (more...).

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Samponha (Cornemuse du Pyrenees)

A double chanter bagpipe that was in use in the Central Pyrenees until early this Century that has now become extinct with no known example only illustrations and a carving to show it's general form. Music from the region suggests a compass of an octave split between the chanters and from the illustrations the drone which lies diagonally downwards across the chest was a bass sounding two octaves below the six finger note.

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Shepherds Pipe (Breughal Pipes)

This based upon the instrument shown by Peiter Breugel the Elder (Circa 1525 - 1569) in his painting the Peasant Dance which is of the same type as that described by Michael Praetorius in "Syntagma Musicum". It consists of a chanter and two drones, these latter being tied into the bag so as to be in a near vertical position whilst played. Praetorius mentions that the Shepherds pipe does not have a thumb hole and careful study of the Breugel painting shows this to be the case here also with the thumb of the upper hand being positioned too far down the chanter for their to be one, the note being played in the picture is the fifth.

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Sourdeline

Classified also as the "Musette du Italie" by Father Marin Mersenne writing in Harmony Universal it was until the advent of the Pastoral and Union Pipes the most complex form of Bagpipe. Invented during the latter half of the 16th Century by three Neapolitans - Jean Baptiste Riva (see also the Phagotum ), Dom Julio and Vincenzo, the simplest form was of two chanters, the compass of an octave split between them occasionally with keywork to extend this further and to provide semitones.

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Welsh Bagpipe

A curiosity found in a cottage in North Wales and said to date from the early 18th century has a very Arabic look to it. It comprises two cane pipes with cow horn bells, waxed into a yoke that bears signs of having at some stage been tied into a bag. Each pipe has six holes and their are no thumb holes as the yoke precludes this. Single reeds are used and the pipes are fingered together for a really exotic effect and sound that is different to Western European Bagpipes.

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